Print this page

Scientific Advisory Board

U-M Depression Center Scientific Advisory Board
*Not all board members are present.

The Scientific Advisory Board consists of members with national and international standing in the area of depression research and academics and have a forward-looking perspective on depression science, research, clinical delivery, and education. The Board will further the Center's comprehensive goals including cross-campus linkages and recognize the importance of transferring neuroscience and behavioral science into new research projects and clinical settings. Members will advise on new research opportunities, faculty recruitment, and resource prioritization while assisting the Depression Center in achieving its strategic aims.

 

Huda Akil, Ph.D., Co-Chair
Co-Director and Research Professor, MBNI
Distinguished University Professor and Quarton Professor of Neurosciences,
Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan

www.mbni.med.umich.edu/mbni/faculty/akil/akil.html

Huda Akil, Ph.D. is the Gardner Quarton Distinguished University Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry at the University of Michigan, and the co-Director of the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute (MBNI).  Dr. Akil has made seminal contributions to the understanding of the neurobiology of emotions, including pain, anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Early on, she focused on the role of the endorphins and their receptors in pain and stress responsiveness. She and her colleagues provided the first physiological evidence for a role of endorphins in the brain; and showed that endorphins are activated by stress and cause pain inhibition, a phenomenon they termed Stress-Induced Analgesia. She defined how the postranslational processing of opioid precursors is modulated by stress, and demonstrated the coordinate actions of the neuropeptide products on behavior. Her research group, in collaboration with Dr. Stanley Watson, characterized the anatomy of the opioid peptides and their receptors, cloned two types of opioid receptors and conducted structure-function analyses defining the molecular basis of high affinity and selectivity towards the endogenous ligands.

Dr. Akil has investigated the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying stress reactivity and their relation to anxiety and depression. She demonstrated that social defeat in rodents activates unique neural pathways that resemble those altered in human depression. She and her colleagues have focused on the role of the steroid stress hormone receptors in emotionality, demonstrating the involvement of the mineralocorticoid receptor in human depression. Most recently her group created a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the glucocorticoid receptor selectively in forebrain and exhibits increased emotional lability and responsiveness to antidepressants, two features of bipolar (manic-depressive) illness.

Dr. Akil is one of the key investigators in a major research consortium using genomic tools to uncover the pattern of gene expression associated with major depression and bipolar illness in human postmortem brains. The same team is embarking on a genome-wide search for the allelic genetic variants involved in bipolar illness.

Dr. Akil ‘s scientific contributions have been recognized with numerous honors and awards. These include the Pacesetter Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in 1993, and with Dr. Stanley Watson, the Pasarow Award for Neuroscience Research in 1994. In 1998, she received the Sachar Award from Columbia University and the Bristol Myers Squibb Unrestricted Research Funds Award. Dr. Akil is the past President of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (1998) and the past President of the Society for Neuroscience (2004).  She was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2000. In 1994, she was elected to the membership of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Science. More recently (2004), she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Melvin McInnis, M.D., Associate Director, Co-Chair
Thomas B. and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor of Bipolar Disorder and Depression, Department of Psychiatry
Director of Prechter Bipolar Research Programs

Melvin G. McInnis, M.D., the Thomas B. and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor of Bipolar Disorder and Depression, leads the University of Michigan’s clinical treatment and research group for Bipolar Disorder.  Dr. McInnis, received his medical training at the University of Iceland, where he developed his interest in the genetics of bipolar disorder.  He completed a psychiatric residency at the Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospitals at the University of London and then spent 15 years at Johns Hopkins University, where he became an associate professor and director of the George Brown Genetics Laboratory.  Dr. McInnis has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles on the genetics and clinical course of bipolar disorders. He is known as an expert in the diagnosis, genetics and clinical management of bipolar and depressive disorders in adolescents and adults.

 

Frank deGruy III, M.D.
Professor and Chair of Family Medicine
University of Colorado Denver

Frank Verloin deGruy III, MD, MSFM, is the Woodward-Chisholm Professor and Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, a position he has held since 1999. Dr. deGruy served as University Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine for three years prior to his move to Denver.

Dr. deGruy received his undergraduate degree at Princeton University in 1970 (sociology, religion) and his medical degree in 1977 from the College of Medicine at the University of South Alabama in Mobile, Alabama. He completed his family medicine residency at The Medical Center in Columbus, Georgia in 1980 and his family medicine fellowship as a Robert Wood Johnson Fellow in Family Medicine at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio in 1982.

Dr. deGruy has held academic appointments at the Departments of Family Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, Duke University, the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and currently the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Dr. deGruy received the Most Outstanding Teacher award for three consecutive years while at Duke University and was named as Distinguished Faculty at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine 1990, 1998, and 1999. He has reviewed over 1,000 grant applications for the NIMH, AHRQ, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He served for five years as the chair of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Depression in Primary Care program. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Families, Systems and Health, the Annals of Family Medicine, and the Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. He is past president of the Collaborative Family Healthcare Association (CFHA), is chair of the Board of Directors of the Family Physicians’ Inquiries Network (FPIN), and the president of the North American Primary Care Research Network. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has authored over 120 papers, chapters, books, editorials, and reviews, and has been the Principal Investigator on about $7 million of research and training grants.

He is married to Geri deGruy and has four children: Mariah (32), Frank IV (30), Kalyn (25), and Kyra (22).

 

J. Raymond  DePaulo, Jr., MD
Henry Phipps Professor and Director
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Psychiatrist-in-Chief, The Johns Hopkins Hospital

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/Psychiatry/about_us/chairman.html

As a faculty member in the Department of Psychiatry for the past 25 years, Dr. DePaulo has been an active clinician, teacher and researcher whose primary area of interest is bipolar depressive disorders.

Dr. DePaulo is one of the world's foremost investigators into the genetic bases of affective disorders, such as manic depression, depression and panic disorder. He has been the principal investigator of numerous research grants, including two current projects, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. His research has contributed to the understanding of depression and bipolar disorder as genetic disorders and has advanced their identification and treatment. Dr. DePaulo continues his public health efforts by promoting and serving on advisory boards of the National Association for Research in Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD), the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and other health voluntary organizations. He is a founding director of the Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association (DRADA), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to alleviate suffering arising from depression and manic depression through self-help groups and public educational programs. 

The author of more than 100 scientific publications, Dr. DePaulo has published his second book, Understanding Depression, which was written for the general public. Dr. DePaulo has received awards from the NIMH, the National Depressive and Manic Depressive Association, and the SELO Prize for outstanding research in depression from NARSAD. 

Dr. DePaulo is a magna cum laude graduate of Xavier University in Cincinnati (B.S., 1968), graduate of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (M.D., 1972) and an elected Alpha Omega Alpha member. He completed his internship in Medicine (1972-73) and his residency in Psychiatry (1973-77) at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

 

David L. Dunner, M.D., FACPsych
Director, Center for Anxiety and Depression
Professor Emeritus, University of Washington

Dr. Dunner earned his AA at George Washington University in Washington, DC, and his MD at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.  After graduating, he completed his internship at Philadelphia General Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his residency in psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine.  He then spent two years at the NIMH and was involved in research studies of bipolar depression.  Among these research studies was the development of the concept of bipolar spectrum disorders - particularly, Bipolar I and Bipolar II.

After NIMH, Dr. Dunner spent eight years at Columbia University (Assistant, then Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry) and the New York State Psychiatric Institute.  He worked for Dr. Ronald Fieve and published studies of clinical, biological, familial and outcome factors comparing unipolar and bipolar disorders.  Among these research studies was the identification of rapid cycling as a major factor leading to poor treatment outcome with lithium.

From 1978 to 2006, Dr. Dunner was at the University of Washington (Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences).  He was Chief of Psychiatry at Harborview Medical Center and later the Director of the University of Washington Psychiatry Outpatient Center.  He was Director of the Center for Anxiety and Depression while at the University and has moved the Center to his private location.  He developed a clinical trials unit (PharmacoResearch) for the study of psychiatric disorders and collaborated with individuals from Psychology and Radiology as well as colleagues in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.  He has mentored several individuals who have progressed to established academic careers.  He was actively involved as a teacher in the medical school, and continues to teach in the psychiatry residency program and at continuing medical education events for practioners.

Dr. Dunner is a member of several scientific organizations: American Psychiatric Association (Distinquished Life Fellow); The American College of Psychiatrists (Fellow, Member of the Board of Regents); American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (Fellow); American Psychopathological Association (Fellow, former President); Psychiatric Research Society (former President); Society of Biological Psychiatry (former President); West Coast College of Biological Psychiatry (former President); and Colleqium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum (Fellow).

Dr. Dunner serves on several editorial boards and is Editor-in-Chief of Comprehensive Psychiatry.

Dr. Dunner’s research interests were primarily devoted to psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments for mood and anxiety disorders.  He has authored or co-authored more than 300 articles and edited or co-edited more than 10 books.  His clinical focus is on difficult to treat patients with depression and bipolar disorders.  He is involved in the treatment of patients who have treatment resistant mood disorders with various pharmacotherapies including augmentation strategies, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and is a referral source for other treatments, such as ECT and VNS.

 

John Greden, M.D.
Executive Director, University of Michigan Depression Center
Rachel Upjohn Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Research Professor, Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute
Founder and Chair, National Network of Depression Centers

Dr. John F. Greden is the Rachel Upjohn Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences in the Department of Psychiatry, Founder and Executive Director of the University of Michigan Depression Center, Founding Chair, National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC), and Research Professor in the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute. He joined the faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School in 1974 and served as Chair of Michigan’s Department of Psychiatry from 1985 to 2007 when he stepped down to focus on directing the Depression Center and developing the NNDC.

Dr. Greden earned his B.S. and M.D. at the University of Minnesota, completed his internship at Harbor/UCLA, and his psychiatry residency at the University of Minnesota Hospitals and Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. He has authored or co-authored more than 400 articles, refereed abstracts, books, book chapters, and presented approximately 335 invited lectures. He has almost three decades of NIH funding as investigator, co-investigator and consultant. Major research themes have focused upon studying biomarkers and developing treatment strategies to prevent recurrences of depression and bipolar disorders. He has served as mentor for more than a dozen NIH or Veterans Administration “K” awardees and young investigators, and presented 10 keynote addresses for the American Psychiatric Association’s “Psychiatry Young Investigators’ Colloquium.”

To address the huge health burdens, disabilities and costs associated with clinical depression, bipolar disorder, and related conditions, Dr. Greden proposed establishment of the country’s inaugural comprehensive Depression Center (www.depressioncenter.org) at the University of Michigan. Approved by the Regents in 2001, the Center integrates research, clinical, educational and public policy efforts of more than 200 members from 8 University Schools and 34 different University departments, centers, or institutes. Dr. Greden subsequently led efforts to establish similar centers throughout the country and integrate them into a National Network of Depression Centers (www.NNDC.org) patterned after the National Cancer Center Network. Sixteen eminent universities signed an NNDC Charter in a ceremony in Ann Arbor in October, 2008.
Dr. Greden serves as the Founding Chair of the National Network of Depression Centers which now has 18 member universities.

Dr. Greden is past-President of the Society of Biological Psychiatry; the Psychiatric Research Society; the American Association of Chairs of Departments of Psychiatry (AACDP); and the Academic Psychiatry Consortium. He edited the Journal of Psychiatric Research for seven years, chaired the Council on Research for the American Psychiatric Association for five years, served as Council Member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), Co-Chair of the National Psychiatry Training Council established by NIMH, and was selected as the 2005 recipient of the Distinguished Alumnus Award of the University of Minnesota Medical School.

 

James S. Jackson, Ph.D.
Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology
Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education
Director of the Institute for Social Research
University of Michigan

http://www.rcgd.isr.umich.edu/people/jackson.html

James S. Jackson is the Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, and Director and Research Professor of the Institute for Social Research. He is the past Chair, Social Psychology Training Program and Director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics, the Program for Research on Black Americans, and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, all at the University of Michigan. He is past-Chair of the Section on Social, Economic, and Political Sciences (K) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is a former Chair of the Section on Social and Behavioral Sciences, and the Task Force on Minority Issues of the Geronontological Society of America, and the Committee on International Relations and the Association for the Advancement of Psychology of the American Psychological Association. He is a former National President of the Black Students Psychological Association and the Association of Black Psychologists. He is the current President of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.

He served on the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging Advisory Council and the Board of Scientific Counselors. He was recently named to the NIH Advisory Council to the Director. He is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Society of Experimental Social Psychology, American Psychological Association, Association of Psychological Sciences, International Demographic Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the recipient of the Distinguished Career Contributions to Research Award, Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, American Psychological Association, the James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award for Distinguished Career Contributions in Applied Psychology, the Association for Psychological Sciences, Presidential Citation, American Psychological Association, and was recently awarded the Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Sciences, New York Academy of Medicine. He was recently named a Senior Health Policy Investigator by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

He has conducted research and published numerous books, scientific articles, and chapters on international, comparative studies on immigration, race and ethnic relations, physical and mental health, adult development and aging, attitudes and attitude change, and Black American politics. Over the last 30 years he has been the principal investigator of over two dozen funded NIH and NSF grants, and is currently directing the most extensive social, political behavior, and mental and physical health surveys on the African American and Caribbean populations ever conducted, “The National Survey of American Life” and the “The Family Connection Survey across Generations and Nations”, and the National Science Foundation and Carnegie Corporation supported “National Study of Ethnic Pluralism and Politics”. He is the Co-Director of the NIH supported University of Michigan “Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities”.

 

William B. Lawson, M.D., Ph.D., D. F.A.P.A.
Professor and Chairman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Howard University College of Medicine and Hospital

Dr. Lawson is currently Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Howard University College of Medicine and Hospital He is also a professor on the graduate faculties of psychology and pharmacology. He is Immediate Past President of the Washington Psychiatric Society, a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a member of the American College of Psychiatrists. He is past Chair of the Section of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences of the National Medical Association, and  past president of the Black Psychiatrists of America.

He received the Howard University Faculty Senate Creativity and Research Award, the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Exemplary Psychiatrist Award and the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, Outstanding Psychologist Award. He was twice named  one of “America’s Leading Black Doctors” by Black Enterprise Magazine, was the Andrea Delgado Honoree and Lecturer for the Black Psychiatrists of America, received the Jeanne Spurlock Award from the American Psychiatric Association,  received the E.Y. Williams Clinical Scholar of Distinction Award from the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Section of the National Medical Association, a Multicultural Workplace Award from the Veterans Administration for his outstanding contributions to the advancement of diversity and multicultural understanding. He received numerous awards for excellent teaching. He was named as a national mentor by the National Alliance of the Mentally Ill, and  is on the Scientific Advisory Boards of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance.

Dr. Lawson received his Bachelor’s degree from Howard University, Master’s from the University of Virginia, and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of New Hampshire.  He received his M.D. degree from the University of Chicago, and did his residency at Stanford University Medical Center.  He completed a fellowship in clinical psychopharmacology at the National Institute of Mental Health intramural program and an addictions fellowship at Vanderbilt University. . He is certified by the Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in General Psychiatry and has Added Qualifications in Addictions.

He has received state, federal, and foundation support for pharmacological research and to develop new and effective treatments. He currently has RO1 grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, and a collaborative agreement with Dartmouth funded  by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. He has recently established collaboration with the mental health system of Bermuda. He has conducted numerous clinical trials of new treatments. These grants have allowed Dr. Lawson to realize his dream of studying the interaction of culture and genetics in ethnicity and mood disorders. . He has over one hundred publications involving severe mental illness and its relationship to psychopharmacology, substance abuse, and racial and ethnic issues. He has a long standing concern about ethnic disparities in mental health treatment, and has been an outspoken advocate for access to services for the severely mentally ill. He has been chair of the Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences since 2000.

 

Francis J. McMahon, M.D.
Senior Investigator
Section Chief, Genetics Unit, Mood & Anxiety Disorders Program, Division of Intramural Research Programs

National Institute of Mental Health

http://neuroscience.nih.gov/Lab.asp?Org_ID=495

Dr. McMahon received a B.A. in Biology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982 and an M.D. from Johns Hopkins in 1987, where he also completed a medical internship, a residency in adult psychiatry, and a post-doctoral fellowship in genetics. In 1998, he moved to the University of Chicago, where he continued his research into the genetics of bipolar disorder while serving as Medical Director of the electroconvulsive therapy clinic. In 2002, he joined the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Intramural Research Program as Chief of its genetics unit. In 2010, he was promoted to Senior Investigator and Section Chief.

Dr. McMahon’s research is aimed at discovering genes involved in mood and anxiety disorders, such as bipolar disorder, major depression, and panic disorder. His work is particularly focused on how genes shape the phenotype, such as clinical symptoms, treatment outcomes, and neuroimaging measures. The long-term objective of his research is to develop a complete picture of the genetic architecture of mood and anxiety disorders, so that better methods of diagnosis and treatment can be developed.

Dr. McMahon is also active outside of NIMH. He also holds a part-time faculty appointment at the Department of Psychiatry of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Behavioral Genetics & Epidemiology study section at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center for Scientific Review. He is Vice President of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, and a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the American Psychopathological Association, and the American Society of Human Genetics. He serves on the editorial boards of Biological Psychiatry and International Review of Psychiatry. He serves as a scientific advisor for the Tourette Syndrome Association, the American Society for the Prevention of Suicide, and the Rutgers University Cell & DNA Repository. He has authored over 100 scientific reports and textbook chapters.

Dr. McMahon has received awards for his work from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD), the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, NIMH, and The Edward F. Mallinckrodt Foundation. In 2008, he was recognized with an NIH Director’s Award for Significant Achievement.

 

Harold Alan Pincus, M.D.
Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Psychiatry
College of Physicians and Surgeons
Co-Director, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research
Columbia University
Director of Quality and Outcomes Research
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

Harold Alan Pincus, M.D. is Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, Director of Quality and Outcomes Research at New York Presbyterian Hospital and Co-Director of Columbia’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. Dr. Pincus also serves as a Senior Scientist at the RAND Corporation.  Previously he was Director of the RAND-University of Pittsburgh Health Institute and Executive Vice Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the National Director of the Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program (funded by Atlantic Philanthropies), and directed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program on Depression in Primary Care and the John A. Hartford Foundation’s national program on Building Interdisciplinary Geriatric Research Centers. Dr. Pincus was also the Deputy Medical Director of the American Psychiatric Association and the founding director of APA’s Office of Research and Special Assistant to the Director of the NIMH and also served on White House and Congressional staffs. 

Dr. Pincus was Vice Chair of the Task Force on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition (DSM IV) and has been appointed to the editorial boards of ten major scientific journals. He has edited or co-authored 23 books and over 350 scientific publications on health services research, science policy, research career development and the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.  Among other projects, he has led the national evaluation of mental health services for veterans, the redesign of primary care/ behavioral health relationships in New Orleans and a National Institutes of Health-funded national study of research mentoring. He has also been a consultant to federal agencies and private organizations, including the U.S. Secret Service, John T. and Catherine D. MacArthur Foundation and served on multiple national and international committees. He was elected chair of the NIH Evaluation Key Function Committee for the Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium and Co-Chairs the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Disease (ICD 11) Technical Advisory Group on Quality and Patient Safety. He has chaired or served on many national and international committees including those for the Institute of Medicine/National Academies (multiple committees including adapting the “Crossing the Quality Chasm” strategy for mental health), the NIH, and committees on quality measurement for the Medicaid and Medicare programs, Affordable Care Act, National Committee on Quality Assurance and National Quality Forum. For over 22 years he worked one night a week treating the severely mentally ill at a community clinic. 

 

Alan F. Schatzberg, M.D.
Kenneth T. Norris, Jr., Professor and Chairman
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine

http://psychiatry.stanford.edu/faculty/

Alan F. Schatzberg received his M.D. from New York University in 1968. He did his psychiatric residency at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center from 1969-1972 and was Chief Resident, Southard Clinic in 1971-1972. He was also a Clinical Fellow in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

After serving in the United States Air Force, he joined the staff at McLean Hospital and the Faculty of Harvard Medical School in 1974. At McLean Hospital, he held a number of important positions including Service Chief, Interim Psychiatrist in Chief, Co-Director of the Affective Disorders Program (with Dr. J. Cole) and Director of the Depression Research Facility. In 1988, he became Clinical Director of the Massachusetts Mental Health Center and Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School but continued at McLean Hospital with his research program on the biology and treatment of depression. In 1991, Dr. Schatzberg moved to Stanford University to become the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr., Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Dr. Schatzberg has been an active investigator in the biology and psychopharmacology of depressive disorders. He has explored norepinephrine systems in depression as a means of subtyping these disorders. His research has also given us major insights into the biological mechanisms that underlie the development of delusions in major depression and is now opening exciting and innovative therapeutic strategies using glucocorticoid antagonists. Dr. Schatzberg has also been an active investigator in the clinical psychopharmacology of nondelusional depression with a particular recent interest in chronic depression. He has authored over 600 publications and abstracts, including the Manual of Clinical Psychopharmacology, whose seventh edition was published in 20010 and which is co-authored by Dr. Jonathan O. Cole and Dr. Charles DeBattista. He also co-edited with Dr. Charles B. Nemeroff the Textbook of Psychopharmacology whose fourth edition appeared in late 2008. He is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Psychiatric Research and sits on many other editorial boards as well, including the Archives of General Psychiatry, Depression and Anxiety, Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, Biological Psychiatry, Psychoneuroendocrinology, and others. He is a Past President of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and the Society of Biological Psychiatry, and was Secretary-General of the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology. He was awarded the 1998 Gerald L. Klerman, MD Lifetime Research Award from the NDMDA, the 2001 Gerald L. Klerman, MD Award from Cornell University Medical College, the 2001 Edward A. Strecker, MD Award from the University of Pennsylvania, the 2002 Mood Disorders Research Award from the American College of Psychiatrists (ACP), the 2005 Distinguished Service in Psychiatry Award from the ACP, the 2002 American Psychiatric Association Award for Research, the Forum Award from the 3rd International Forum of Mood and Anxiety Disorders (IFMAD) and the 2005 Falcone Award from NARSAD. In 2003, he was elected into the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

Madhukar Trivedi, M.D.
Professor, Department of Psychiatry
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Madhukar H. Trivedi, M.D., is Professor and Chief of the Division of Mood Disorders in the Psychiatry Department at UT Southwestern Medical Center. He holds the Betty Jo Hay Distinguished Chair in Mental Health and is an established efficacy researcher in pharmacological, psychosocial, and other nonpharmacological depression treatments.

Dr. Trivedi has been a principal investigator (PI) on multiple NIMH and Texas Department of Mental Health funded studies. He is PI of the NIDA-funded “Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE)” study investigating the effectiveness of adding exercise to treatment as usual to improve drug treatment outcomes. Dr. Trivedi is the Texas Node PI of NIDA’s Clinical Trials Network. Additionally, he was the PI of the Depression Trials Network “Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes (CO-MED)” that focused on using specific antidepressant combinations to increase remission rates, and the Co-PI on NIMH’s, “Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D).”

Dr. Trivedi was selected to serve as Lead PI on the EMBARC project. EMBARC is at the core of the NIMH’s initiative to identify a biosignature for depression and is unique in its design to evaluate biomarkers from across a full spectrum of possible biological markers. His ongoing work on EMBARC provides an extensive background for his contribution to the Neurobiological Markers used in the study.

Dr. Trivedi has been involved with the NNDC since the inception, leading a successful effort through the Research Domain Committee to formulate the Comprehensive Assessment Package being used in the NNDC. Dr. Trivedi serves as Co-Chair of the newly formed Biomarker Task Group of the NNDC.

Dr. Trivedi has received numerous awards including the Gerald L. Klerman award from the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association Scientific Advisory Board-NDMDA and the Psychiatric Excellence Award from the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians-TSPP. He has mentored multiple psychopharmacology postdoctoral fellows/residents and is PI of an NIMH-funded Postdoctoral T32 training program. He is a member of several institutional NIMH review groups and has published over 390 manuscripts on mood disorder diagnoses and treatment.

 

Hyong Un, M.D.
Head of EAP – Chief Psychiatric Officer
Aetna Health Inc.

www.aetna.com

Dr. Hyong Un is the Head of EAP and the Chief Psychiatric Officer for Aetna’s Behavioral Health. He has been with Aetna since February 2002. He is responsible for supporting the development of clinical strategic plans and quality management for Aetna Behavioral Health. Dr. Un also oversees the development of innovative behavioral health disease and care management programs as well as initiatives that promote integration of behavioral health with medical management.

Dr. Un graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Medicine in 1981 and completed his residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in 1985.

Prior to joining Aetna, he served as Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Friends Hospital, the nation’s first private psychiatric hospital and as the Executive Medical Director of The Counseling Program of Pennsylvania Hospital and PennFriends Behavioral Health System, two regional managed behavioral healthcare organizations. Dr. Un’s clinical interest lies in the fields of neuropsychiatry and psychopharmacology.  He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association.

 

Myrna M. Weissman, Ph.D.
Professor of Epidemiology in Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons and the School of Public Health at Columbia University
Chief of the Division of Epidemiology at New York State Psychiatric Institute

http://www.mailman.columbia.edu/our-faculty/profile?uni=mmw3

Dr. Weissman is a Professor of Epidemiology in Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and Chief of the Division of Epidemiology at New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI).  She is a member of the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology at Columbia.  Until 1987, she was a Professor of Psychiatry and Epidemiology at Yale University School of Medicine and Director of the Depression Research Unit.  She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.  She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University School of Medicine in 1974.

She has received numerous awards for her research.  In April 2009, she was selected by the American College of Epidemiology as 1 of 10 epidemiologists in the United States who has had a major impact on public policy and public health.  The summary of her work on depression appears in a special issue of the Annals of Epidemiology, Triumphs in Epidemiology.